Education for Health

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 33  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 81--82

Volunteering to organize quiz events: What motivates medical students?


Chetna Dengri1, Yash Aggarwal1, Vishali Moond1, Amir Maroof Khan2,  
1 Medical Student, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, Delhi, India
2 Associate Professor, Department of Community Medicine and Coordinator, Medical Education Unit, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Amir Maroof Khan
Room 414, 4th Floor, Department of Community Medicine and Medical Education Unit, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, Delhi
India




How to cite this article:
Dengri C, Aggarwal Y, Moond V, Khan AM. Volunteering to organize quiz events: What motivates medical students?.Educ Health 2020;33:81-82


How to cite this URL:
Dengri C, Aggarwal Y, Moond V, Khan AM. Volunteering to organize quiz events: What motivates medical students?. Educ Health [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Mar 4 ];33:81-82
Available from: https://www.educationforhealth.net/text.asp?2020/33/2/81/302489


Full Text



Dear Editor,

In addition to being a clinician, an Indian Medical Graduate is also expected to fulfill roles demonstrating leadership, professionalism, communication, and life-long learning.[1] This involves acquiring competencies such as time management, conflict management, team-based work, multitasking, networking, planning, negotiation, and resource management.[2] Organizing events such as medical quiz help in acquiring the competencies related to these roles. Medical students voluntarily organize medical quizzes in their colleges either during college fests, student conferences, or as independent events. Our work was conducted to find out the factors that motivate medical undergraduate students to volunteer to organize medical quizzes and to identify the perceived benefits of organizing such events among the medical students.

A cross-sectional study was conducted among the medical undergraduate students of all the eight medical colleges in Delhi, who had volunteered in organizing medical quiz in their respective colleges in the last 1 year. The study was conducted from July to September 2019 using online Google Forms. In all, 35 students from all the medical colleges were involved. Majority (13/35, 37.1%) of the students belonged to 3rd year of course, followed by 5th-year students (9/35, 25.7%), 2nd year (6/35, 17.1%), internship (6/35, 17.1%), and 4th year (1/35, 2.9%).

Each student had volunteered in organizing an average of 1.7 quiz events in the last 1 year and spent a median time of 12 h (range: 1–96 h) in organizing one quiz event.

The roles played by student volunteers in organizing were quizmasters (65.7%, 23/35), scorekeepers (37.1%, 13/35), event promoters (31.4%, 11/35), timekeepers (22.9%, 8/35), and audiovisual aid managers (17.1%, 6/35). The main motivational factors to volunteer for organizing quiz among medical students were having a personal interest (74.3%), improving academics (62.8%), and developing organizational skills (62.8%) [Table 1].{Table 1}

The perceived benefits of volunteering to organize medical quiz as mentioned by medical students were that it allows them to share knowledge (82.9%, 29/35), meet motivated peers (80.0%, 28/35), develop interest in medicine (74.3%, 26/35), gain confidence (37.1%, 13/35), and build their reputation in colleges (31.4%, 11/35). Motivation for volunteering is important to be studied as it can help in devising appropriate strategies to optimize the potential of the student volunteers.[3]

Most studies related to quiz in medical education have focused on the improvement of learning outcomes, but not on the volunteering domain.[4] Recent studies that explored volunteering among medical students are related to running clinics.[5]

Improving academic performance, as well as developing organizational skills, was the major motivating factor for organizing medical quiz events among medical students, and this was uniform across the junior and senior years of medical students.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

References

1Medical Council of India. Competency based Undergraduate Curriculum for the Indian Medical Graduate. New Delhi: Medical Council of India; 2018. p. 17-20. Available from: https://www.mciindia.org/CMS/information-desk/for-colleges/ug-curriculum. [Last accessed on 2020 Mar 08].
2International Federation of Medical Students’ Associations. Global Policy in Medical Education. Amsterdam: International Federation of Medical Students’ Associations; 2016. p. 1-2. Available from: https://ifmsa.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/2016MM_PS_Global-Policy-in-Medical-Education.pdf. [Last accessed on 2020 Mar 01].
3Widjaja E. Motivation Behind Volunteerism. CMC Senior Theses. Paper 4; 2010. Available from: http://scholarship.claremont.edu/cmc_theses/4. [Last accessed on 2020 Mar 01].
4Vaena MMV, Alves LA. Formative online quiz on hemotherapy from blood physiology to transfusion medicine: A pilot study conducted with Brazilian medical students. Adv Physiol Educ 2018;42:644-7.
5Smith SD, Johnson ML, Rodriguez N, Moutier C, Beck E. Medical student perceptions of the educational value of a student-run free clinic. Fam Med 2012;44:646-9. Available from: http://www.stfm.org/fmhub/fm2012/October/Sunny646.pdf. [Last accessed on 2020 Mar 01].