Print this page Email this page Users Online: 621 | Click here to view old website
Home About us Editorial Board Search Current Issue Archives Submit Article Author Instructions Contact Us Login 


 
 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 33  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 120-121

Evidence-based-medicine amidst the pandemic: A path towards continuing medical education and the combat of misinformation


1 Otorhinolaryngology Unit Residency Program, Department of Surgery, Onofre Lopes University Hospital, Natal, Brazil
2 Undergraduate Medical Students, Health Sciences Center, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Brazil
3 Department of Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Brazil
4 Department of Integrated Medicine, Cardiology Unit, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, Brazil

Date of Submission09-May-2020
Date of Acceptance14-Feb-2021
Date of Web Publication16-Mar-2021

Correspondence Address:
Elaine Lira Medeiros Bezerra
Department of Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, Health Sciences Center, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, 620 Nilo Pecanha Av., Natal
Brazil
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/efh.EfH_163_20


How to cite this article:
Paula Bedaque Hd, Carvalho de Souza AK, Lopes IS, C. Simas BC, Dantas Bezerra MP, Medeiros Bezerra EL, da Silva Maia FG. Evidence-based-medicine amidst the pandemic: A path towards continuing medical education and the combat of misinformation. Educ Health 2020;33:120-1

How to cite this URL:
Paula Bedaque Hd, Carvalho de Souza AK, Lopes IS, C. Simas BC, Dantas Bezerra MP, Medeiros Bezerra EL, da Silva Maia FG. Evidence-based-medicine amidst the pandemic: A path towards continuing medical education and the combat of misinformation. Educ Health [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Apr 21];33:120-1. Available from: https://www.educationforhealth.net/text.asp?2020/33/3/120/311317



Dear Editor,

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought intense changes in the life of medical students, such as the suspension of most theoretical classes and a massive load of information sources, from reliable and scientific to sensationalist and fake news.[1] In this context, medical students from a tutorial education program, residents, and professors from our institution had the idea to take advantage of this moment to reinforce important pillars of evidence-based medicine (EBM).

Through public online conferences twice a week, scientific articles concerning COVID-19 were critically analyzed, focused on bringing medical students back to the academic environment, to prompt teaching in the field of EBM and enlighten the truths that science has brought about this pandemic. In April, we held six online meetings, consisting of clinical features, diagnostic tests, therapies and public health interventions, with an average of 51 people per meeting, including listeners all over Brazil, and not only our state.

In every conference, one of the students of the tutorial education program presented a recently published article on the topic of COVID-19 – not only concerned about discussing its content but also critically appraising its methods, biases and conceptualizing EBM. Afterward, debate was stimulated, in which other participants and an invited professor and expert in the area could add remarks, ask and answer questions. Creating a trustworthy online environment to disseminate scientific light and EBM concepts, besides enabling people to interact and exchange ideas, was also a move in promoting virtual educational settings in the student's curriculum – seen as a new goal in medical education.[2]

Our final message is the replicability and resiliency of our attitude. We currently have open access articles from reputable journals, online conferences and above all, our social networks as huge dissemination tools for continuing medical education. These are the ingredients needed to bring medical students, healthcare providers, and teachers to meet again. Social isolation or the pandemic should not stop education.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Ioannidis JP. Coronavirus disease 2019: The harms of exaggerated information and non-evidence-based measures. Eur J Clin Invest 2020;50:e13223.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Rose S. Medical student education in the time of COVID-19. JAMA 2020;323:2131-2.  Back to cited text no. 2
    




 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article
References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed202    
    Printed4    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded48    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal