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CCPH SPECIAL SECTION
Year : 2001  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 241-250

Legislative Advocacy for Health Professions Educators


Department of Community Medicine and Healthcare, Connecticut A rea Health Education Center Program, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, CT, USA

Correspondence Address:
Charles G Huntington
263 Farmington Avenue, MC 3960, Farmington, CT 06030-3960
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


Because much of health professions education in the US is publicly financed, the actions of politicians have profound effects on the organiz ation of health professions education. The success of health professions education programs, therefore, depends in part on the ability of educators to advocate for change in the legislature. Successful legislative advocacy requires a general understanding of the legislative process and the needs of politicians combined with effective communications strategy. The tools of individual legislative advocacy include position papers, letter writing, politician meetings and visits, and using the media. Professional associations advocate on behalf of their members through coalitions, key contact programs, grassroots campaigns, and lobbyists. Successful legislative advocacy depends on credibility and the development of long-term relationships with members of the legislature. The process of legislative advocacy is straightforward and should be viewed as an integral part of health professions education.


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