Education for Health

STUDENT CONTRIBUTION
Year
: 2016  |  Volume : 29  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 142--147

Which peer teaching methods do medical students prefer?


Nithish Jayakumar1, Danushan Srirathan1, Rishita Shah1, Agnieszka Jakubowska1, Andrew Clarke2, David Annan1, Dekan Albasha3 
1 School of Medicine, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, United Kingdom
2 Clinical Education Centre, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, United Kingdom
3 Department of General Surgery, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Nithish Jayakumar
Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Turner Street, London E1 2AD
United Kingdom

Background: The beneficial effects of peer teaching in medical education have been well-described in the literature. However, it is unclear whether students prefer to be taught by peers in small or large group settings. This study«SQ»s aim was to identify differences in medical students«SQ» preferences and perceptions of small-group versus large-group peer teaching. Methods: Questionnaires were administered to medical students in Year 3 and Year 4 (first 2 years of clinical training) at one institution in the United Kingdom to identify their experiences and perceptions of small-and large-group peer teaching. For this study, small-group peer teaching was defined as a tutorial, or similar, taught by peer tutor to a group of 5 students or less. Large-group peer teaching was defined as a lecture, or similar, taught by peer tutors to a group of more than 20 students. Results: Seventy-three students (81% response rate) completed the questionnaires (54% males; median age of 23). Nearly 55% of respondents reported prior exposure to small-group peer teaching but a larger proportion of respondents (86%) had previously attended large-group peer teaching. Of all valid responses, 49% did not have a preference of peer teaching method while 47% preferred small-group peer teaching. The majority of Year 3 students preferred small-group peer teaching to no preference (62.5% vs 37.5%, Fisher«SQ»s exact test; P = 0.035) whereas most Year 4 students did not report a particular preference. Likert-scale responses showed that the majority of students held negative perceptions about large-group peer teaching, in comparison with small-group peer teaching, with respect to (1) interactivity, (2) a comfortable environment to ask questions, and (3) feedback received. Discussion: Most respondents in this study did not report a preference for small-versus large-group settings when taught by peers. More Year 3 respondents were likely to prefer small-group peer teaching as opposed to Year 4 respondents.


How to cite this article:
Jayakumar N, Srirathan D, Shah R, Jakubowska A, Clarke A, Annan D, Albasha D. Which peer teaching methods do medical students prefer?.Educ Health 2016;29:142-147


How to cite this URL:
Jayakumar N, Srirathan D, Shah R, Jakubowska A, Clarke A, Annan D, Albasha D. Which peer teaching methods do medical students prefer?. Educ Health [serial online] 2016 [cited 2020 Jul 16 ];29:142-147
Available from: http://www.educationforhealth.net/article.asp?issn=1357-6283;year=2016;volume=29;issue=2;spage=142;epage=147;aulast=Jayakumar;type=0