Print this page Email this page Users Online: 530 | Click here to view old website
Home About us Editorial Board Search Current Issue Archives Submit Article Author Instructions Contact Us Login 
ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 109-113

Grit: A predictor of medical student performance


1 Department of Behavioral Health, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan, USA
2 Department of Medical Education, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA
3 Department of Otolaryngology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan, USA

Correspondence Address:
Lisa Renee Miller-Matero
Henry Ford Hospital, 2799 West, Grand Boulevard, Detroit, MI 48202
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/efh.EfH_152_16

Background: Several predictors of medical school performance have been identified, yet more research is needed to select applicants who will perform well. Grit is a personality trait that is described as persevering through difficult tasks. Although it is hypothesized that this type of trait would be high in a medical student population, this has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to examine grit among medical students and to explore whether grit-predicted performance in medical school. Methods: There were 131 graduating medical students who completed a questionnaire in May 2014 on grit as well as demographic questions and involvement in other activities in medical school. Data on test scores, years in medical school, and class ranking were obtained from the medical school. Results: The average grit score among 130 medical students was high (mean = 4.01, standard deviation = 0.42). Those who completed the program in 4 years had higher grit scores than those who completed in 5 years (P = 0.01). Grit was related to medical school performance including clinical knowledge scores (P = 0.02). There was also a difference between the highest and lowest class rank (P = 0.03). Discussion: Medical students have high levels of trait-like perseverance and it appears that those with higher levels of grit are more likely to perform better in medical school.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1985    
    Printed54    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded406    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 6    

Recommend this journal