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BRIEF COMMUNICATION
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 30  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 79-83

Teaching procedural skills to medical students: A pilot procedural skills lab


1 Department of Emergency Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine; Department of Exercise and Sports Science, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
2 Department of Emergency Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
3 Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
4 Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA

Correspondence Address:
Laurence M Katz
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 170 Manning Drive, Chapel Hill, NC 27599
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1357-6283.210516

Background: Medical students have limited confidence in performing procedural skills. A pilot study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a multifaceted Procedural Skills Lab (PSL) on the confidence of medical students to perform procedural skills. Methods: Twelve 2nd year medical students were randomly selected to participate in a pilot PSL. The PSL students met with an instructor for 2 h once a week for 4 weeks. Students participated in a flipped classroom and spaced education program before laboratory sessions that included a cadaver laboratory. Procedural skills included a focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST) scan, cardiac echocardiogram, lumbar puncture, arthrocentesis, and insertion of intraosseous and intravenous catheters. Students in the PSL were asked to rank their confidence in performing procedural skills before and after completion of the laboratory sessions (Wilcoxon ranked-sum test). A web-based questionnaire was also emailed to all 2nd year medical students to establish a baseline frequency for observing, performing, and confidence performing procedural skills (Mann–Whitney U-test). Results: Fifty-nine percent (n = 106) of 180 2nd year medical students (n = 12 PSL students [treatment group], n = 94 [control group]) completed the survey. Frequency of observation, performance, and confidence in performing procedural skills was similar between the control and treatment groups at baseline. There was an increased confidence level (p < 0.001) for performing all procedural skills for the treatment group after completion of the PSL. Discussion: An innovative PSL may increase students' confidence to perform procedural skills. Future studies will examine competency after a PSL.


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