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BRIEF COMMUNICATION
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 415

Helping Students Become the Medical Teachers of the Future - The Doctors as Teachers and Educators (DATE) Programme of Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London


1 Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Centre for Medical Education, Whitechapel, London, United Kingdom
2 St George's University of London, Centre for Medical and Healthcare Education, London, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
V Cook
Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Centre for Medical Education, Whitechapel, London
United Kingdom
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 20853243

Context: In the United Kingdom (UK), learning about teaching is an integral part of the General Medical Council's recommendations for the undergraduate medical curriculum. Yet often, implementing this aspect of learning presents a challenge to curriculum organisers in terms of content, timing and student interest. Programme Objectives and Structure: The Doctors as Teachers and Educators (DATE) programme was set up at Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry specifically to meet the requirements for development in teaching. Although largely practical, the two-day programme offers an introduction to educational theory and the teaching requirements for junior doctors in training. The methods used are lectures and group work within plenary sessions, followed by small group micro-teaching sessions. The DATE programme has now been undertaken by over 900 graduates. Evaluation Methods: We evaluated the Date programme by means of end-of-course questionnaires completed by two cohorts of students during the 2007/8 academic year and through the use of Nominal Group Technique in 2008/9. In line with the goals of the evaluation, the data on students' views were analysed to elicit self-reported learning and develop the programme. Results: Response rates of the two cohorts to the surveys were high (80% and 98%). Nearly 100% of the students reported through the survey that they had gained confidence in teaching. In the nominal groups, students indicated that they had gained insight into educational principles like student-centredness and gained an appreciation for the nature of educational evidence and scholarship. They challenged the curriculum organisers to achieve an appropriate balance between theory and practice. Conclusions: A programme about teaching at the undergraduate medical level can be well-received by students; the DATE model could be transferred to other international contexts.


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